Environmental Sustainability Sessions at IFLA in August!

IFLA World Library and Information Congress (WLIC) 2016  will be held 13-19 August, in Columbus, Ohio, USA with the theme:  Connections. Collaboration. Community.  The programme is available online now.

The Environmental Sustainability and Libraries Special Interest Group (SIG) will have an open session which includes an introduction of the IFLA Green Library Award winner and Business meeting along with a few papers,  on Thurs. 8/18 10:45-12:45 (session 215) called “Green Libraries: Together, for All”

Papers:

1. Using Library Information Technologies and Resources to Support Sustainable Projects, Hong Xu (University-Corpus Christi, United States). Paper in English

2. Environmentally Sustainable Library Buildings: opportunities and challenges for Asian countries, Saima Qutab (University of Dammam, Saudi Arabia) Zainab Faruqui Ali (University of Dammam, Saudi Arabia) Farasat Shafi Ullah (University of Dammam, Saudi Arabia). Paper in English.

3. Searching for Sustainability – a blended course in how to search interdisciplinary, Mauritza Jadefrid (Gothenburg University Library, Sweden) Joakim Lennartsson (Gothenburg University Library, Sweden) Christian Kleinheiz (Gothenburg University Library, Sweden) Mats Blomberg (Gothenburg University Library, Sweden). Paper in English.

Also, stop by the IFLA Awards Presentation where the Green Library Award will be presented  in the Expo Pavilion / Tech Lab, Tuesday 8/16 at 12:45pm (session 140)

CFP for Libraries and Archives in the Anthropocene: A Colloquium May 2017

**Proposals due August 1st**

Libraries and Archives in the Anthropocene: A Colloquium
May 13-14, 2017
New York University
As stewards of a culture’s collective knowledge, libraries and archives are facing the realities of cataclysmic environmental change with a dawning awareness of its unique implications for their missions and activities. Some professionals in these fields are focusing new energies on the need for environmentally sustainable practices in their institutions. Some are prioritizing the role of libraries and archives in supporting climate change communication and influencing government policy and public awareness. Others foresee an inevitable unraveling of systems and ponder the role of libraries and archives in a world much different from the one we take for granted. Climate disruption, peak oil, toxic waste, deforestation, soil salinity and agricultural crisis, depletion of groundwater and other natural resources, loss of biodiversity, mass migration, sea level rise, and extreme weather events are all problems that indirectly threaten to overwhelm civilization’s knowledge infrastructures, and present information institutions with unprecedented challenges.
This colloquium will serve as a space to explore these challenges and establish directions for future efforts and investigations. We invite proposals from academics, librarians, archivists, activists, and others.
Some suggested topics and questions:
– How can information institutions operate more sustainably?
– How can information institutions better serve the needs of policy discussions and public awareness in the area of climate change and other threats to the environment?
– How can information institutions support skillsets and technologies that are relevant following systemic unraveling?
– What will information work look like without the infrastructures we take for granted?
– How does information literacy instruction intersect with ecoliteracy?
– How can information professionals support radical environmental activism?
– What are the implications of climate change for disaster preparedness?
– What role do information workers have in addressing issues of environmental justice?
– What are the implications of climate change for preservation practices?
– Should we question the wisdom of preserving access to the technological cultural legacy that has led to the crisis?
– Is there a new responsibility to document, as a mode of bearing witness, the historical event of society’s confrontation with the systemic threat of climate change, peak oil, and other environmental problems?
– Given the ideological foundations of libraries and archives in Enlightenment thought, and given that Enlightenment civilization may be leading to its own environmental endpoint, are these ideological foundations called into question? And with what consequences?
Formats:
Lightning talk (5 minutes)
Paper (20 minutes)
Proposals are due August 1, 2016.
Notifications of acceptance will be sent by September 16, 2016.
Submit your proposal here: http://goo.gl/forms/rz7uN1mBNM

Summary of ALA Conference 2016 SustainRT sessions!

For those that couldn’t make the ALA conference and attend our SustainRT sessions,  you can read about two of the sessions SustainRT hosted in American Libraries Magazine:

Carribean Libs at ALAAlso, a panel of Caribbean Librarians spoke: The National Library of Aruba: Promoting, Enhancing and Embracing Green Education

 

 

 

And if you want more content, check out these  !

Going to ALA in Orlando next week?

SustainRT has lots of great sessions (see below) You might also want to check out this listing of diversity events at ALA as well

 

ALA Annual Conference, Orlando

  • more info here: http://www.alaannual.org/
  • Saturday morning, June 25, 8:30 – 10 a.m. “Sustainable Thinking,” presentation by Matthew Bollerman (Hauppauge Public Library (New York) and Rebekkah Smith Aldrich (Mid-Hudson Library System (New York) will explore how to infuse the core value of sustainability into everything we do, taking a “whole systems approach” to leading our libraries into the future and building our base of support among those we serve along the way. 
  • Saturday afternoon, 1 – 2:30 p.m., SustainRT will hold its annual business meeting, “SustainRT: Libraries Fostering Resilient Communities.” ALL ARE WELCOME! 
  • Saturday evening, 5:30 – 7 p.m.  connect with SustainRT and the ALA Social Responsibilities Round Table members during a joint social at Marlow’s Tavern, 9101 International Drive.
  • Sunday morning, June 26,   10:30 – 11:30 a.m., “Planting the Seeds: Libraries and Librarians as Change Agents for Sustainability within Their Communities” will explore how libraries of all kinds, already cornerstones of their communities and hubs of exchange, are uniquely positioned to act as change agents within those communities to become sustainable, resilient and regenerative.   Panelists will include Jodi Shaw, children’s librarian, Brooklyn Public Library; Madeleine Charney, sustainability studies librarian, University of Massachusetts Amherst; Mary Beth Lock, director of Access Services, Wake Forest University; and Ray Pun, first year student success librarian, California State University, Fresno.
  • Sunday afternoon, 4:30 – 5:30 p.m., “The National Library of Aruba: Promoting, Enhancing and Embracing Green Education” will feature a panel of representatives from the National Library of Aruba (NLA) and partner organizations from the Caribbean island nation, the Netherlands and the United States as they share their experiences holding a series of symposia from 2012-2015 for 6,000 students and teachers in secondary schools and higher education on sustainable energy, food supply, and soil practices.  

SustainRT Travel Awards for ALA 2016

 Attention SustainRT members!  The Sustainability Round Table will be offering two $100 travel awards toward attendance at the ALA conference in June 2016.  The awards will be granted to one current SustainRT member currently employed by a library or library-related organization, and one student currently enrolled in an M.L.I.S. program at the time of the conference.

The requirements for the student award are that applicants must:

  • Be currently enrolled in an M.L.I.S. program as of the conference date.
  • Submit a written essay (500 word limit) or 1-2 minute video essay on why it’s important for librarians to promote sustainability.
  • Grant permission for SustainRT to post their submission to the SustainRT blog and other social media.
  • Agree to write a short blog post (250-500 words) about their experience attending ALA and/or how they think that the Sustainability Round Table can encourage their fellow students to take an interest in promoting sustainability at their schools and in their communities.

Requirements for the professional award are that applicants must:

  • Be a current SustainRT member.
  • Be currently employed by a library or a library-related organization.
  • Submit a written essay (500 word limit) or 1-2 minute video essay on a project they have undertaken to make their library greener or to promote sustainability in their community.
  • Agree to write a short blog post (250-500 words) about their experience attending ALA and/or  how they think that the Sustainability Round Table can encourage and support librarians who wish to promote sustainability in their libraries and communities.

Entries should be sent to sustainrtoutreach@gmail.com by midnight  June 8, 2016

The winner will be announced by June 15, 2016.

Let’s get Sustainability in this CFP: Perspectives on the Future of Library and Information Science Education

From Madeleine Charney’s Post on sustainRT list: 

Great opportunity to write about LIS education and sustainability – examples from the call below that resonate with SustainRT >>>>

Librarian values
Qualities and qualifications necessary for effective LIS educators
Qualities and qualifications necessary for future librarians/LIS students
The changing nature of the communities that libraries serve and how LIS education has (or has not) addressed these changes

Proposal deadline is June 6th

CALL FOR PROPOSALS –  Please direct questions and submissions to: advancesLISeducation@gmail.com

Re-Envisioning the MLS: Perspectives on the Future of Library and Information Science Education
Edited by Lindsay C. Sarin, Johnna Percell, Paul T. Jaeger, & John Carlo Bertot.

The last several years have been marked by a number of societal challenges and changes that include, but are not limited to, the evolving nature of our economy; the workforce skills needed to succeed in a shifting job market; advances in technology; the changing nature of information and the methods of accessing it; transformations in education and learning approaches; and rapid demographic shifts occurring in our communities. Libraries are not immune to these challenges, and there is much discussion regarding the future of libraries among library professionals, in the media, and by politicians. As we consider the future of libraries, we need to simultaneously focus on the future of librarians – and how our instructional programs in general and the Master of Library Science (MLS) degree (and its variants) programs – prepare them for their careers. Taking inspiration from the University of Maryland’s iSchool and the Information Policy & Access Center’s (iPAC) Re-Envisioning the MLS initiative, this book seeks chapters on topics that include, but are not limited to:

  • The extent to which the MLS/MLIS degree is necessary or not necessary; The changing nature of the communities that libraries serve and how LIS education has (or has not) addressed these changes;
  • Librarian values
  • Qualities and qualifications necessary for effective LIS educators;
  • Qualities and qualifications necessary for future librarians/LIS students;
  • Aspects of the MLS/MLIS degree we need to maintain and/or those we need to let go;
  • Career paths for LIS grads (e.g. pathways outside of libraries);
  • The relevance of ALA accreditation and/or a discussion of the accreditation process; and
  • The impact of iSchools on MLS/MLIS education.

The book welcomes chapters that include case studies, empirical studies, and best practices from around the world. Please direct questions and submissions to: advancesLISeducation@gmail.com

Important Dates:

June 6, 2016: Submission of 750-1,000 word chapter proposal
July 8, 2016: Notification of chapter acceptance to authors
October 1, 2016: Draft chapter due
November 1, 2016: Final chapters due
Summer 2017: Estimated publication date

About the Editors
Lindsay C. Sarin is the Master of Library Science (MLS) Program Manager of the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland, Reviews Editor of The Library Quarterly, and Editor of The Political Librarian.

Johnna Percell is the Communications Coordinator of the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland and Associate Editor of The Political Librarian.

Paul T. Jaeger, Ph.D., J.D., is Professor, Diversity Officer, and Director of the Master of Library Science (MLS) program of the College of Information Studies and Co-Director of the Information Policy and Access Center at the University of Maryland.

John Carlo Bertot, Ph.D., is Professor and co-director of the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) in the College of Information Studies at the University of Maryland College Park.

Winners of the IFLA Green Library Award 2016

IFLAs ENSULIB (Environmental Sustainability and Libraries)
Winners of the IFLA Green Library Award 2016 

1st Place: El Pequeño Sol ecological library (The Little Sun Ecological Library), Germinalia A.C., San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico, which was found to be “a project where sustainability was in the soul of the project from the first starting of the idea until to the new library”.

— THIS STORY IS AWESOME! Worth #1 slot – a must watch —


2nd Place: City of Cockburn, Australia, which was characterized as an “excellent green building with sustainable projects”.


3rd Place: La Tierra para quien la siembra (The Land is for those who sow), Columbia, which was found to be “Good working for sustainability with the community!”


More information about the IFLA award and the winning video: ENSULIB | ENSULIB on Facebook

For further information:Petra Hauke (Berlin, Germany), contact person for the IFLA Green Library Award: petra.hauke@hu-berlin.de, or Harri Sahavirta (Helsinki, Finland), convener of ENSULIB: harri.sahavirta@hel.fi.