Book: Library Service and Learning: Empowering Students, Inspiring Social Responsibility, and Building Community Connection

ACRL announces the publication of Library Service and Learning: Empowering Students, Inspiring Social Responsibility, and Building Community Connections, edited by Theresa McDevitt and Caleb P. Finegan. This thorough book describes active teaching techniques that help build community, are relevant to students’ current lives and future career goals, and allow students to work together to solve real problems and shape their own successful and empowering learning. Divided into three comprehensive sections—Library and Information Literacy Credit-Bearing Courses or Sponsors of Undergraduate Community-Based Research; Library Support for Courses with Applied Service-Based Projects in the Disciplines; and Library as Location for Student-Led Educational Outreach Events and Projects—Library Service and Learning is a collection of case studies written by librarians, university faculty, and students who have successfully employed service-based or experiential learning experiences for students in higher education. You can purchase in print and as an ebook through the ALA Online Store.

IFLA’s ENSULIB Updates!

IFLA Green Library Award 2018

The third annual IFLA Green Library Award, sponsored by De Gruyter, announces the Call for Submissions for 2018. All the details may be found here: https://www.ifla.org/node/10159

Call for Papers for IFLA WLIC 2018

Join ENSULIB and the Library Services for Children and Young Adults Section for a joint session at IFLA WLIC 2018 in Kuala Lumpur. The Call for Papers may be found here: https://2018.ifla.org/calls-for-papers

Forthcoming Book

Collaborative Strategies for Successful Green Libraries: Buildings, Management, Programs and Services (working title) will be published this summer by De Gruyter. The contents will be drawn from papers given at ENSULIB?s 2017 Satellite Meeting, Open Session with the Public Libraries Section at WLIC 2017, and the 2107 IFLA Green Library Award.

 

Green Library Checklist available now in 22 languages!

The Green Library Checklist was originally  part of the book The Green Library = Die grüne Bibliothek. The challenge of environmental sustainability / ed. on behalf of IFLA by Petra Hauke, Karen Latimer and Klaus Ulrich Werner. München/Boston: De Gruyter Saur, 2013. VIII, 433 pp., Ill. (IFLA Publications, 161) ISBN 978-3-11-030972-0 Available with Open Access at https://www.ibi.hu-berlin.de/de/studium/studprojekte/buchidee/bi12 

This Green Library checklist is now available in all official IFLA languages!

 Deutsch/English (original) — Arabic — Chinese — French — Russian — Spanish —– Catalan — –Croatian —Finnish — Hindi — Hungarian — Italian — Norwegian — Polish — Romanian — Serbian — Swahili — Swedish — Thai — Turkish — Usbek

 

Zen Pig Books – mindfulness for kids!

Screen Shot 2016-08-01 at 9.24.14 AMZen Pig, by Mark and Amy Lynn Brown—  a children’s book series written and illustrated by a husband and wife team from Nashville, TN, designed to nurture the seeds of gratitude, mindfulness and love in young children. Each book sold gives 10 people clean water for 1 year through Mocha Club. A great series for all sustainable librarians to buy!

Visit Www.zenpigbook.com for more info & to shop for the books.

 

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Book-to-Action Toolkit? Learn more in Thursday’s FREE webinar!

Libraries often have book clubs, right? but what happens when you leave the book club event … anything? How about this concept of Book-to-Action:  that book you read, that idea that inspired you or cause that calls your name, how about putting it into action by engaging in a community service project related to the book’s topic!  If you want to learn more about this idea, then join this FREE SustainRT Webinar –  Collaborating for sustainability: community and publisher partnerships and the book to action program –  Thursday, February 4, 2016, 12:15 – 12:45 pm (EST) –  REGISTER NOW!

Webinar Overview:  Local community organizations and publishers can be valuable partners for libraries in creating sustainability-oriented programming. Join us on February 4 for this free SustainRT webinar to learn as Sally Thomas and Michael Weaver describe Book-to-Action programs which extend the idea of a book discussion by not only scheduling an author/speaker, but also partnering with a public service organization for a volunteer day or other community service opportunity. For more information, see the Book-to-Action Toolkit

Book Review (Part 4/4): Ecology, Economy, Equity

Henk_300Ecology, Economy and Equity Book, Part III: Sustainable Librarianship in Practice has four sections and a lot of challenges for librarians and a section worth slowly reading, discussing and considering how to act on these ideas. The first section deals with the challenges of technology and corporate power in the library. Henk clearly states that much of the suggestions in the earlier sections are easier to accomplish than this last part where we are looking at larger system,  power issues and often things indirectly related to people’s daily lives – often overlooked are the consequences or important results of these decisions. In this section she dives into the digital library and Open Access movement to combat the expensive, exclusive, publishing behemoths (three publishing companies own 42% of all journals now!). The idea of enclosure of information is critical to understand – previously shared resources, not at prohibited costs with  barriers to access.   A simple example starts with a public university researcher, writing up their results for tenure and to share or advance their discipline, paying a commercial entity to publish it, and then the same university having to pay for access to the material. Henk also notes from the research this notion of disposable people – technological and economic barriers to access the information that is needed and should be readily available for use. An example she gives is the high toll libraries have to pay ongoing to access electronic materials from publishers on an ongoing basis – materials in the past were previously owned (perhaps in paper format). She also notes the shift from library control to these webscale ILS and discovery systems where we turn over our control and access. Companies can decide they do not want to work with a competitor and the result is we (our uses) do not get access to key journals since our ILS is not friendly with another vendor. Libraries are loosing our value added capabilities and now more of a marketer and trainer of vendor products.

The next section is on curbing corporate power. The power imbalances she already covered leds us to this section where Henk offers some ideas and considerations on how to curb this power. Awareness is a start and advocacy is important. We need to work with these companies but can we look at the “good guys” in publishing, those with more sustainable practices or the smaller companies to support. Henk offers two paths – directly confronting vendors or working through our political system, through advocacy and action; the second path is building a new system through open access or open source projects. Mandy supplies some good steps for advocacy through library organizations, nonviolent actions, and boycott ideas, giving some well known examples so check out this part of the book for more details.

The third section is on resolving the technology dilemma. Starting out she comments on what always bugs me, why aren’t people in the world paying attention to this global critical issues of climate change. Using research she explains the various forms of denial and “it’s not pc to discuss” syndrome especially found in the US. With lots of researched facts and information, she offers ideas on what we can do through library advocacy, writing and presenting on the topic, pushing our large library organizations to make some real changes. I believe we are slowly moving ahead in this area – the new Sustainability Round Table (SustainRT) of ALA founded in 2013 as one such step.

The last section is on the visioning of the sustainable library. Librarians tend to be practical in nature, but creating a new vision is something we should be doing, dreaming of possibilities and actions we could take and voicing this publicly, not hiding behind “its out of my control.” I believe this is the crux of the book as a whole.

Conclusion/Action Items: This book allowed me to consider ideas I had not thought of, actions we as librarians could take, questions to start asking, processes and workflows to rethink. This book would be the perfect read for a group of librarians or for a workshops or conference or sustainability committee to share, discuss and act upon. I hope my blog posting on the content I found in the book, helps continue the dialogue and more librarians will find this book, read it and encourage others to do the same.

Read the entire REVIEW: Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3