Online certificate to integrate education for sustainable development…

Earth Charter Center for Education for Sustainable Development has a new online certificate program on education for sustainable development  in collaboration with the UN Mandated University for Peace.

This Online Certificate Diploma is designed to provide participants with the understanding, knowledge, and skills to integrate Education for Sustainable Development and Education for Global Citizenship into classrooms, schools, and curricula with depth and creativity. It contributes to the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals, with a specific focus on SDG 4, target SDG 4.7 .  The Certificate Program has a duration of five months and consists of four courses plus five seminars. Each course consists of five sessions (one per week) with a minimum hourly load per participant about 124 hours, which involves 4 hours per week to read and see all the materials per session, plus the time for the seminars, and the preparation and implementation of a final project (individually or in group). Find out more here! 

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SolarSPELL: Solar Powered Educational Learning Library

Just read about this super interesting new method to deliver a digital library that comes with its own Wi-Fi hotspot – useful for many rural areas around the globe.

Arizona State University professor Laura Hosman in the Schools of Engineering and the School for the Future of Innovation in Society created this innovative device, the Solar Powered Educational Learning Library, known as SolarSPELL

WHAT IS IT?  A digital library full of educational resources that generates its own Wi-Fi signal and solar power though any internet-capable device, such as an iPad, laptop or smartphone. AKA – a self-powered plug-and-play kit, portable enough to fit into a backpack.

ODLOS blog Intersections – calls for contributors

The ALA Office for Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services (ODLOS)is launching Intersections, a new blog that highlights the everyday work of library and information science workers as they advocate for equity and inclusion as they relate to diversity, literacy and access among membership, the field of librarianship and the communities they serve. The blog invites submissions from across the library profession featuring:

  • those from historically and disadvantaged racial and ethnic groups;
  • those who experience socioeconomic barriers, people experiencing hunger, homelessness and poverty;
  • immigrants, refugees and new Americans; those discriminated against based on nationality or language;
  • those who are geographically isolated;
  • those experiencing barriers in regards to access to literacy; and new and non-readers.

 

 

Winners of the IFLA Green Library Award 2016

IFLAs ENSULIB (Environmental Sustainability and Libraries)
Winners of the IFLA Green Library Award 2016 

1st Place: El Pequeño Sol ecological library (The Little Sun Ecological Library), Germinalia A.C., San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico, which was found to be “a project where sustainability was in the soul of the project from the first starting of the idea until to the new library”.

— THIS STORY IS AWESOME! Worth #1 slot – a must watch —


2nd Place: City of Cockburn, Australia, which was characterized as an “excellent green building with sustainable projects”.


3rd Place: La Tierra para quien la siembra (The Land is for those who sow), Columbia, which was found to be “Good working for sustainability with the community!”


More information about the IFLA award and the winning video: ENSULIB | ENSULIB on Facebook

For further information:Petra Hauke (Berlin, Germany), contact person for the IFLA Green Library Award: petra.hauke@hu-berlin.de, or Harri Sahavirta (Helsinki, Finland), convener of ENSULIB: harri.sahavirta@hel.fi.

ALA members – want to help with greening the conferences?

SustainabilityRoundTable

 

 

Join SustainRT project group to explore at how ALA works and how we could assist with implementing more sustainable practices including “greener” conferences.  Much of this work can be done virtually and you do not have to be a regular ALA conference goer to participate –  more ideas the better to determine possibilities!

Here is the info >>>

ALA Governance Tag Team

Reaches out to ALA administration and leadership better understand “how ALA works” and identify pressure points on which we can focus. This group also explores how to help “green the conference.” 

Contact: Beth (filarwilliams [at] gmail .com]

Green Office Certification

Our campus Sustainability Office is promoting a Green Office Certification Program – no reason why any library couldn’t follow these same ideas and procedures as well. We are completing by department in the library since we are a large library.   The goal is to help the University work toward carbon neutrality and reaching its sustainability goals.  These resources help guide us through the process, and help us rethink what we do, using their ample resources and tools –  and you can make it sort of a competition as well to get folks motivated. We all work off this spreadsheet with points given for each item, categorized by area. There are some very good instructions here:

The office provides some great resource guides too. I’m sharing here as I’m sure others could benefit and get ideas for your own library from this list:

Open eBook: Abrupt Impacts of Climate Change

coverThe National Academies Press has released this FREE pdf of this book Abrupt Impacts of Climate Change: Anticipating Surprises (2013) but you can buy the paperback to add to your library collections as well. The well-respected established authors are from the Committee on Understanding and Monitoring Abrupt Climate Change and Its Impacts; Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate; Division on Earth and Life Studies; National Research Council. This 200+ page book notes the primary abrupt changes to be concerned about the most and those most of concern for humans, with ideas for moving forward. It also gives some quality reference links and a solid summary of those committee members writing the document. Click on the Related Resources tab to find some short summary and report as well as a visual slideshow of examples of abrupt climate change for those looking for a more visual summary. The Multimedia tab offers a video (embed below too) of findings and recommendations.

Their description:

Climate is changing, forced out of the range of the past million years by levels of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases not seen in the Earth’s atmosphere for a very, very long time. Lacking action by the world’s nations, it is clear that the planet will be warmer, sea level will rise, and patterns of rainfall will change. But the future is also partly uncertain — there is considerable uncertainty about how we will arrive at that different climate. Will the changes be gradual, allowing natural systems and societal infrastructure to adjust in a timely fashion? Or will some of the changes be more abrupt, crossing some threshold or “tipping