Climate Voices: Webinar on Future of Global Climate Policy TOMORROW

Climate Voices is hosting this webinar:
February 4, 2015, 12:00–1:00 p.m. EST (more events here)

Dr. Rachel Cleetus, the lead climate economist at the Union of Concerned Scientists will lead this webinar, focused on where the world left off in the recent global climate talks in Lima, Peru. She will offer viewpoints on the United States climate and energy policy landscape, opportunities and challenges ahead, and rethinking how we cope with the growing risks and costs of climate change. Dr. Cleetus will speak about policy in the United States at the regional, state, and national levels, including EPA standards, carbon pricing, clean energy policies, and policies that help build resilience to the impacts of climate change, and how we can prepare for the upcoming climate talks in Paris.

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3981449614551465730/

 

More about Climate Voices…

Their goal to engage in non-partisan conversations about the research findings of the majority of climate scientists to citizens across the United States and Puerto Rico. By connecting with neighbors and community organizations they aim to  initiate discussions about the local effects of a changing climate and possible ways to address impacts. They have a great MAP to help you find a local speaker. Be sure to check their RESOURCES tab for some useful talking points, reports, guides, videos and more!

SustainRT Sustainability Database!

SustainabilityRoundTableThe Sustainability Round Table of ALA is collecting information on books, articles, websites, blogs, social groups, and projects that fall under the umbrella of Sustainable Libraries. Please use this form to suggest resources or projects that will become part of our SustainRT Sustainability Database.

Fill out the form here: http://goo.gl/forms/JMP8ua7GT6

Please contact Eileen Harrington (eharring@umd.edu) for more information.

JSTOR Global Plants + a JSTORY video!

Check out this video from JSTOR or in other words a JSTORY! Jeanine Vélez Gavilán discusses her career in botany, her passion for endangered plants, and how climate change challenges botanists today. This story is also to help promote their Global Plants Initiative —  an international undertaking by leading herbaria to digitize and make available plant type specimens and other holdings used by botanists and others working in botany and other fields every day with partners from 300 institutions,  70 countries (read more). JSTOR provides the production, platform, technical, and promotional support to the participating Global Plants Initiative partners. You can search and view details on the collection but to view the images  you must be a subscribing institution.

Green Office Certification

Our campus Sustainability Office is promoting a Green Office Certification Program – no reason why any library couldn’t follow these same ideas and procedures as well. We are completing by department in the library since we are a large library.   The goal is to help the University work toward carbon neutrality and reaching its sustainability goals.  These resources help guide us through the process, and help us rethink what we do, using their ample resources and tools –  and you can make it sort of a competition as well to get folks motivated. We all work off this spreadsheet with points given for each item, categorized by area. There are some very good instructions here:

The office provides some great resource guides too. I’m sharing here as I’m sure others could benefit and get ideas for your own library from this list:

FILM: Economics of Happiness (it’s about localization!)

Our campus (and librarian run!)  sustainability film and discussion series, now on its 9th year, hosted  our first  film of the year last week entitled   “Economics of happiness” – a film about globalization and localization. Worth a showing at your library followed by a discussion on what it means, and how to be local in your own communities!

Not only is the film worth a blog post,  but the collaboration with the campus and student learning is worth mentioning too.  This series has always partnered with the Weatherspoon Art Museum (on our campus),  and supported by the UNCG Office of Sustainability and the Environmental and Sustainability Studies Program, but this year’s film series is in conjunction with the Warren Ashby Dialogue series, –  a year-long interdisciplinary conversation on the philosophy of localization as a response to global social and environmental change. With over 180 people in attendance (our largest group yet!), standing room only, with more than half being students, we hope this trend continues all  year long.

In our post film discussion, we talked about supporting our local farmers markets, attending locally run permaculture workshops, edible school yards, back door breakfasts, and creating a local map or website showing what business are local.  Some key comments:  there are limits to acting individually but not to acting locally;  infinite growth does not work on a finite planet.  One positive  story — a  new student mentioned her frustration on buying a T-shirt in the bookstore to show her school spirit, only to find they were all made in another country:  she ventured the idea as an art/design student, to work with other students to come up with designs, for T-shirt, and other to create a prototype… then  a business student piped up that he could help with the marketing of it.  Not only a community connection but one coming from students!

Some film resources:

 

Gardening Resource

This infographic below (from Care2.com but created by Goodtobehome) could be a fun resource to hang in your library or use to start a garden with your school, public library community or campus. OR, use this example as a template to create one of your own for your area. Note that the infographic is for a zone in Great Britain so it might not correlate directly to your area. But some things I like about this are the visual display of companion plantings, the “did you know” section or tips, and even the planting legend and chart showing spacing, propagation, etc.

UK housing energy fact file infographic

Tool Lending Libraries

Don’t you just love that libraries are now lending so many different things for patrons? Isn’t it greener to share tools then buy you own that you might once a year? Tool lending libraries allow patrons to borrow tools or equipment (sometimes for a fee but often free of charge!)   This article in the Seattle Times also reminds u that these types of libraries  “help build community.”  The article notes tha Seattle has a number of these tool lending libraries:

But there is a lot more tool lending libraries in the US and beyond.  Check out the list on Wikipedia if you are curious of one near you.  My home state of Maryland has oen at the Station North in Baltimore and is a good example to check out: you can borrow for 8 days, they ask for donation (even just a $1), they offer Tool 101 workshops and soon will be having workspace for public! And you can even check out their inventory online.

 

Hmm my current state of North Carolina doesn’t have one – someone should get on that 🙂