Creative Recycling

We recently hosted film night showing Terra Blight   –  a feature-length documentary exploring America’s consumption of computers and the hazardous waste we create in pursuit of the latest technology – at my university. Featured in the is film and leading our post film discussion were members of Creative Recycling.  Creative Recycling  was wonderful to discover!  They started in Tampa in 1990 but are now  up and down the east coast, in almost 19 states and growing.  They provide state-of-the-art lifecycle management solutions for surplus, obsolete and end-of-life electronic products.  Those leading our post film discussion were from the local Raleigh plant  which is an actual processing facility, working with municipalities, businesses, schools, government, etc. Their goal is to teach others how to do recycling and then pick it up and  process it from them

We need to shift focus and think of recycling electronics as a commodity (this is why they don’t call it e-WASTE)  & job creation (they have 80-100 jobs at any one facility & growing!).  They can generate money from just about every component of electronics they process.  Their unique processing plant  [photo!] allows for the recycling of electronic components in a single computerized process –  up to 24,000 pounds of recyclables per hour (or 800 monitors)  and in an environmentally safe manner taking less than five minutes for a single item to complete the recycling process!

Is Creative Recycling anywhere near you? Check out the map to see and stay tuned as they are growing nationally!

eCycling

This EPA  eCycling page offers some information on  recycling of electronic products like computers, tvs, cell phones, etc.  There is some general information on reusing, recycling and buying green for electronics.You can search via a map for regional and State electronics recycling programs. There is a good list of organization if you are looking to donate or recycle your computer. They also offer some interesting statistics on end of life electronics if you are curious. The Regulations page dives into legislation and mandates on used electronics. Over all is a very useful online information resource for your library or your patrons.